Last edited by Daimuro
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

2 edition of Redheaded pine sawfly found in the catalog.

Redheaded pine sawfly

Louis F Wilson

Redheaded pine sawfly

its ecology and management

by Louis F Wilson

  • 380 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service in [Washington, D.C.?] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Redheaded pine sawfly,
  • Sawflies

  • Edition Notes

    StatementLouis F. Wilson, Robert C. Wilkinson, Jr. and Robert C. [i.e. Robert D.] Averill
    SeriesAgriculture handbook ; 694, Agriculture handbook (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 694
    ContributionsWilkinson, Robert C, Averill, Robert D, United States. Forest Service
    The Physical Object
    Pagination54 p. :
    Number of Pages54
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13614290M

    Redheaded pine sawflies, for example, as caterpillars have red heads and black-spotted, yellow/white bodies measuring up to 1/5 inch in length. Adults have bodies measuring up to 3/8 inch in length with black bodies, though the females also have white stomach markings. Redheaded Pine Sawfly adult [L L Hyche, Auburn University, ] DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGE The redheaded pine sawfly is the most widespread and destructive of the pine sawflies and is considered an important pest of ornamental, forest, and especially plantation trees. It usually feeds on young trees, preferably to m tall.

    Redheaded pine sawfly Neodiprion lecontei Order Hymenoptera, Family Diprionidae; conifer sawflies Native pest Host plants: Mugo, red, jack and Scotch pines that are less than 4–5 meters high are preferred, but many different species of pines are also susceptible. Description: Adults are wasp-like, brownish, and ap-proximately 12 mm long.   Redheaded Pine Sawfly They feed on “Preferred hosts are red, Scots and jack pines. Also attacked are shortleaf, loblolly, slash, pitch, Swiss mountain, Japanese black, mugho pines, white pine, larch, deodar cedar, and Norway spruce” according to the Forest Pests website.

    Redheaded Pine Sawfly (Neodiprion lecontei) Attacks: Hard pines such as the jack or red pine are often attacked. Scots pine, eastern white pine, Norway spruce, and tamarack are sometimes attacked. Trees less than 15 feet tall are preferred by this insect. Introduced pine sawfly White pine sawfly Redheaded pine sawfly The spring species commonly feed only on old foliage, giving trees a tufted appearance with new foliage only at the branch ends. The summer species generally feed first on the current year's foliage, then attack older needles. This causes greater growth reduction and tree mortality.


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Redheaded pine sawfly by Louis F Wilson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Redheaded pine sawfly larvae may lift the front and rear portions of their bodies in a defensive mechanism if threatened and regurgitate a chemical sequestered from the pine needles in an attempt to thwart potential predators. Figure 5. Mature larvae of the redheaded pine sawfly, Neodiprion lecontei (Fitch).

Note the red head capsules. The Redheaded Pine Sawfly. One of books in the series: Leaflet (United States. Department of Agriculture) available on this site. Description. Describes the characteristics of red-headed pine sawflies, the damage they cause to varieties of pine trees, and methods of control.

The Redheaded Pine Sawfly., book, February ; Washington by: 1. The redheaded pine sawfly is native to southeastern Canada and throughout the eastern and southern United States.

Redheaded pine sawflies prefer two- and three-needle pines including Scots, jack, shortleaf, loblolly, slash, Redheaded pine sawfly book, and mugho.

It has occasionally been found feeding on white pine, Norway spruce, and larch when these trees are near its. Redheaded Pine Sawfly. This distinctive larva has a red head with 2 black eye spots and six rows of black spots along a yellow-white body.

They are 1 to /4 inches long when full grown. The redheaded pine sawfly can be very destructive, attacking trees 1 foot to 12 feet tall. Additional Physical Format: Wilson, Louis F. Redheaded pine sawfly. [Washington, D.C.]: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, [] (OCoLC) COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

Introduction. There are over species of sawflies in the U.S. whose larvae feed on the foliage of conifers; several occur in Tennessee including introduced pine sawfly (Diprion similis), redheaded pine sawfly (Neodiprion lecontei), and European pine sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer).Sawflies are not actually flies (Order Diptera), but rather they are a type of non-stinging wasp.

Neodiprion lecontei is a species of sawfly in the family Diprionidae native to eastern North America, commonly known as the red-headed pine sawfly or leconte's larvae feed on the foliage of many species of native and imported pines.

This species was named after John Lawrence LeConte, an American entomologist of the 19th : Diprionidae. BIOLOGY Distribution-The redheaded pine sawfly occurs throughout the eastern United States and in southeastern Canada. Host Plants-Although the redheaded pine sawfly was first described inserious outbreaks and the killing of host trees were not common until the establishment of pine red hosts are jack, red, shortleaf, loblolly, slash, longleaf, pitch, and.

Eggs of the redheaded pine sawfly, Neodiprion lecontei (Fitch), in pine needle. Photograph by Lacy L. Hyche, Auburn University, Larva: The length of the mature larva is 18 to 25 mm with variable coloration (see Table 1). Figure 7. Virginia pine sawfly larva. Georgia Forestry Commission. Figure 8.

Virginia pine sawfly larva. Redheaded Pine Sawfly Neodiprion lecontei (Fitch) Hanson, T., and E. Walker. [n.d.] Field guide to common insect pests of urban trees in the Northeast. Waterbury, VT: Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation.

Redheaded pine sawfly: Its ecology and management (Agriculture handbook) by Louis F Wilson and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Buy Redheaded pine sawfly: Its ecology and management (Agriculture handbook) on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders.

Neodiprion sertifer, the European pine sawfly or red pine sawfly, is a sawfly species in the genus gh native to Europe, it was accidentally introduced to North America in The larvae of Exhyalanthrax afer feed on N.

sertifer cocoons. (+)-Catechin 7-O-β-glucoside, isorhamnetin 3,7,4′-tri-O-β-glucoside, kaempferol 3,7,4′-tri-O-β-glucoside and quercetin 3,7,4′ Family: Diprionidae. The redheaded sawfly (Neodiprion lecontei) is a cream colored larva, about an inch long when fully grown.

It has a red head with six irregular, black spots along its body. The preferred hosts are two-and-three needle pines (jack, red, Scots, pitch) and some five-needle pines. Overwintering eggs that have been deposited in the needles can be easily located after a heavy frost turns the egg-laying scar yellow.

(See "Pine Sawfly – Species" for a detailed description of larvae.) Life Cycle - European Pine Sawfly. In August to September, the adult European pine sawflies emerge from their cocoons to mate and lay eggs. However, they are not, they are the Redheaded pine sawfly (Neodiprion lecontei).

Sawflies look like flies as adults and like caterpillars as larvae but they are neither flies nor moths and butterflies. In fact they are in an order of insects more closely related to primitive wasps than anything else.

Unlike Wasps, they have a wide waist. Abstract: The redheaded pine sawfly, Neodiprion lecontei (Fitch), is a major regeneration pest of pines, Pinus spp., in the eastern USA.

The larvae feed gregariously on new and old needles of most eastern pines and also on the tender bark of young seedlings. The degree of damage is highly variable, depending on stress levels of infested trees. Aerial application of baculovirus on red-headed pine sawfly, Neodiprion lecontei (Fitch) in (Forest Pest Management Institute.

Report FPM-X) [Kaupp, W. J] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Aerial application of baculovirus on red-headed pine sawfly, Neodiprion lecontei (Fitch) in (Forest Pest Management : W.

J Kaupp. Pine sawfly larvae reach up to 25mm long and are pale green in colour with a brown head and black markings. Fox-coloured sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) larvae also reach 25mm in length are a dirty green colour with a black lateral stripe and a black head.

Both species feed in groups on the needles of pines during the spring and summer. REDHEADED PINE SAWFLY (Neodiprion lecontei) Markings:reddish head, yellowish white body with six rows of black spots Hosts: loblolly, slash, pitch, shortleaf, and longleaf pines (eastern white pine and deodar cedar) Present: Spring to heavy frost.Experimental testing of a virus, carried out in Quebec and Ontario inconfirmed its efficacy against the sawfly.

For ornamental or isolated trees, the recommended approach is to shake the stems and collect and destroy all the larvae that fall to the ground. Canadian Forest Service Publications. Redheaded pine sawfly. Diet and feeding.Figure 9. Adult female redheaded pine sawfly, Neodiprion lecontei (Fitch), laying eggs in a pine needle.

Credit: James McGraw, North Carolina State University, www. Figure 7. Cocoons of the redheaded pine sawfly, Neodiprion lecontei (Fitch). Large female cocoons on the left, smaller male cocoons on the right.